• Welcome to the Submitted Content Forum. You may use this part of the message board to submit content for reviewing before it is posted at the main site.
    • Acceptable Material
      If it is a review it has to be one of a game or emulator.
      If it is a guide/manual it has to do with emulation(how to use an emulator etc), not a game.
      New releases - Keep in mind that we check other sites regularly for those ourselves.
    • Necessary Requirements
      You may not copy content written by another person and claim it as your own. Any material found to be breaking that requirement will be removed.
    • Images
      You may use as may images as you like. At first you will have to host them to one of the many free image hosting services available. Once your material is officially posted we will copy them on the server.

Terminal Launch V

thePretender

New member
Super fast, simple launcher without the pretty gui and bloat.
Select console -> Game -> Play!

I been working on this for a few years off and on. I think I have it the way I like it. Yes (to the old guys), I leaned toward the BBS look :cool:
Thanks for looking




Download the latest here (Mediafire)
 

pix07

Member
Great project but sadly only for windows.

And by the way you can hosting it on github.

But now github collects data because was buyed by microsoft.

Or sourceforge which is better.
 
Last edited:

thePretender

New member
Great project but sadly only for windows.

And by the way you can hosting it on github.

But now github collects data because was buyed by microsoft.

Or sourceforge which is better.
Hi.
This always produces an interesting debate, however, I'll just simply state as Linux is not for gaming, nor are any apple products (which are based on Linux cores(simplified answer), Tablets fall in the same category as well. Windows is the most logical choice for me. Now in defense of Linux, this could feasibly work, as I might write it in python or java, as I believe both will work on either OS.

Do misunderstand me, not a supporter of WINBLOWS, I am a big Linux nut,, however, the downside, I do not have the freedom to do what I want where my hobbies are. I am anti-win 10/11 for reasons suitable for another thread.

I have a few things on GitHub and a ton on sourceforge, I have not made this open-source yet. still tinkering with the source, and I think both sites prefer open source to use their site.

But!
If you can try it out, great - this might run on Linux, but under wine probably, Have not tested it.
 

thePretender

New member
@pix07 Yuppers! however Steam Linux is extremely limited on what is available LOL, and SteamOS is horrible (imho). You can add me on steam (Ra7eN) The only nice thing about SteamOS I was happy to see, was that it used debian - it would have been crazy for something like "Arch" LOL!!

Retroarch is what motivated me to write my own. I just wanted a library to select a console, game, and play. Most of the big ones out there are just to bloated for me, and the setup is crazy. Mine is just 500 lines of code and does what it is designed to do. Not to mention I have an unhealthy addiction to DOS stuff. Old BBS SYSOP. heheh
 

thePretender

New member
Yup got that, but it is still EXTREMELY limited when it comes to games. Steam SHOULD HAVE taken up ReactOS. It IS (an older version of) windows. Linux on the other hand, is NOT designed for games, I have almost a thousand games, and only a fraction of them work on steam OS/Linux, at least without hopping through hoops, or using some third party app or wine, so using it, would be moot, as I would have to switch all the time. Why would they use a system that does not allow its customers to utilize ALL of their games at their leisure? weird. They didn't need an OS anyways - sorta like Google trying to get into the social media craze (Google+ <-- original right) - wasn't needed and failed, steamOS failed for the same reason - wasn't needed.
Also speaking of, I noticed other frontends now adding other front ends LOL now thats just silly (IMHO!)
 

thePretender

New member
Correct!
It would make much more sense for steam to use ReactOS (the only open source windows clone) for game compatibility. Zero reasons to use an OS that limits 80% of your game library.
 

Lefteris_D

Administrator
Staff member
Gaming on linux has come along way and should really not be ignored. And in terms of emulation, since it is kind of our area here, the vast majority of systems have native linux emulators already.
 

thePretender

New member
meh, not really, Less than 1% since 2019 of the population uses Linux. Unless major vendors take a liking to Linux. the gaming world of Linux will fade all together - Android coming out in 08 seems to blow right on by everyone hands down, and with more games than just about any OS has (which is REALLY sad, because they both share the same kernel, but Linux STILL needs to emulate an android game - weird huh). With this info, I found it not necessarily viable to make a Linux version of TERMINAL LAUNCH V, since not many would use it. Now don't get me wrong, I love Linux, My go-to distro is Bohdi. However, when it comes time for real gaming and other hobbies, it's back to W7. Like you said, "emulation" is your area here, but not OS's :) And basing ANY software on its ability to run on a particular OS, undermines its functionality. For Example, GParted is an amazing disk tool, but I would never say, it's greats but "sadly" doesn't run on windows. And same with the shortcomings of Linux games - but sadly - they require something like wine to play (which in turn most of them will suffer performance issues)

:)
 

pix07

Member
@thePretender Android kernel is moded to use smartphones so you cant normally use android games which uses that hardware.

But their kernel looks the same here infographic:
ape_fwk_all.png


  • Application framework. The application framework is used most often by application developers. As a hardware developer, you should be aware of developer APIs as many map directly to the underlying HAL interfaces and can provide helpful information about implementing drivers.
  • Binder IPC. The Binder Inter-Process Communication (IPC) mechanism allows the application framework to cross process boundaries and call into the Android system services code. This enables high level framework APIs to interact with Android system services. At the application framework level, this communication is hidden from the developer and things appear to "just work".
  • System services. System services are modular, focused components such as Window Manager, Search Service, or Notification Manager. Functionality exposed by application framework APIs communicates with system services to access the underlying hardware. Android includes two groups of services: system (such as Window Manager and Notification Manager) and media (services involved in playing and recording media).
  • Hardware abstraction layer (HAL). A HAL defines a standard interface for hardware vendors to implement, which enables Android to be agnostic about lower-level driver implementations. Using a HAL allows you to implement functionality without affecting or modifying the higher level system. HAL implementations are packaged into modules and loaded by the Android system at the appropriate time. For details, see Hardware Abstraction Layer (HAL).
  • Linux kernel. Developing your device drivers is similar to developing a typical Linux device driver. Android uses a version of the Linux kernel with a few special additions such as Low Memory Killer (a memory management system that is more aggressive in preserving memory), wake locks (a PowerManager system service), the Binder IPC driver, and other features important for a mobile embedded platform. These additions are primarily for system functionality and do not affect driver development. You can use any version of the kernel as long as it supports the required features (such as the binder driver). However, we recommend using the latest version of the Android kernel. For details, see Building Kernels.
From: https://source.android.com/devices/architecture
 
Top