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Thread: 1964 emulator doesn't work.

  1. #1

    Default 1964 emulator doesn't work.

    I'm trying to use the 1964 emulator to play N64 games. However, when I map the control stick controls to the D-Stick on my N64 controller, it doesn't work, in game! It will map just fine on the controller configuration screen, but when I actually play the game, it doesn't do anything!

    Project 64 isn't much better. I know the D-stick works; it works just fine on ZSNES, but on Project 64, it won't let me map down, or right, on the N64's control stick, to the D-stick on my Xbox 360 gamepad. I WOULD just use the D-pad, but I need analog control for the control stick.

    Can someone recommend an N64 emulator that actually freaking WORKS?!

    EDIT: I don't know what I did, but I somehow managed to get the controls mapped the way I want on Project 64. However, there's still one problem.

    You know, on ZSNES and Visual Boy Advance, if you map the D-pad on the emulator to respond to the D-stick on your controller, you can't move diagonally? Well, I've got that problem, here. At first, I just thought that it was because the D-stick and the D-pad aren't supposed to go together, but now that problem exists on the N64! I'm playing Goldeneye, and I can't move and turn around at the same time! It's a mess! If I want to turn around, I have to do it like in Resident Evil; I have to stop dead in my tracks, turn around, and THEN move!

    What am I supposed to do?
    Last edited by stebbinsd; April 18th, 2011 at 16:12.

  2. #2

    Default Re: 1964 emulator doesn't work.

    I haven't had any controller mapping issues in Project 64. I'm using an N64 USB Controller adapter, however, and it appears you're using an Xbox 360 controller -- although that really shouldn't make much of a difference if you calibrate correctly. When I first got the adapter, I plugged in the N64 controller and went to Control Panel > Game Controllers (selecting the correct USB GamePad) > Properties > 'Settings' tab > Calibrate. After calibrating everything I went in to PJ64 and mapped the keys. It worked fine.

    The only time I've had issues with moving diagonal was in the Snes9x emulator, in which case that was just me not noticing there was an area in the button configuration section for mapping "Up Left", "Down Right", etc. For PJ64, however, there's no "Up Left" mapping, just the four directions for your D-pad and analog stick.
    Last edited by Scope32; April 18th, 2011 at 17:34.

  3. #3

    Default Re: 1964 emulator doesn't work.

    [QUOTE=Scope32;110059]although that really shouldn't make much of a difference if you calibrate correctly.[/quuote]
    Apparently, there's more to calibrating it than simply mapping the buttons.

    When I first got the adapter, I plugged in the N64 controller and went to Control Panel > Game Controllers (selecting the correct USB GamePad) > Properties > 'Settings' tab > Calibrate. After calibrating everything I went in to PJ64 and mapped the keys.
    How do I do that on Vista?

  4. #4

    Default Re: 1964 emulator doesn't work.

    I don't have Vista, but according to the internet it should be the same steps as I outlined above:

    Click 'Start' > 'Control Panel' > Click 'Game Controllers' > Highlight the correct GamePad on the list then click 'Properties' > Select the 'Settings' tab > Click 'Calibration' and follow the on-screen steps. When this is finished click 'Test'. Each time you move your analog stick it should move in the square with "X Axis / Y Axis" written under it. Each time you press a button on the GamePad it should light up as one of the numbers under the 'Buttons' section and so forth. This means it's calibrated. If they don't light up then something wasn't calibrated correctly and you'll have to try again and/or find a manual for your GamePad that may give you more information on how to calibrate it.

    NOTE: For the fourth step "Highlight the correct GamePad...", this is in the case of having multiple GamePads on the list under 'Installed Game Controllers'. For instance my N64 Controller USB adapter allows for two N64 controllers to be plugged in, so when I went to configure I had two GamePads to choose from. I was unsure which one corresponded to which N64 plug, so I clicked on one, went in and checked if the analog stick moved the '+' inside the box. If it didn't I then selected the second GamePad, in which case the analog stick did move the '+'. Then I calibrated. If you only have one GamePad, however, then there's no need to worry about whether you've selected the proper GamePad or not.

    When you've finished calibrating select 'Apply'/'Ok' where applicable to save your calibration and leave the menus. Your GamePad should now be calibrated. When you go into your emulator of choice you should map the keys in their configuration windows. As long as Windows recognizes all the GamePad buttons through calibration, then you should be able to map them all to their corresponding configurations in your emulator.

    And like I've said, I've only had in-depth experience with PJ64 and SNES9x emulators, both of which have worked flawlessly with my N64 USB Controller adapter through following the above steps and mapping the controls in the emulators after.
    Last edited by Scope32; April 18th, 2011 at 17:58.

  5. #5

    Default Re: 1964 emulator doesn't work.

    It's asking me to press the Z axis all the way up and down.

    What does that mean?

  6. #6

    Default Re: 1964 emulator doesn't work.

    When I calibrated, this is what happened:

    1. Find center point
    --- You just press your A button without touching the Analog Stick, since it's trying to find the Analog Stick's center--

    2. Axis Callibration
    --- Move your Analog Stick of choice in full circles several times then press your 'A' button --

    3. Verify Center Point
    --- Do the same thing as you did in Step 1 ---

    4. Axis Callibration (Move the Z Axis all the way up and down...)
    --- I was confused about this at first, but I just pressed my C-Up and C-Down and those seemed to correspond to making that huge bar shorter or longer. For a 360 controller, however, I'm not quite sure what it might correspond to, however I'd venture to guess it may correspond to one of your two analog sticks. When calibrating I just fiddled with it to find out, honestly. It's VERY IMPORTANT, however, to make sure that the Z Axis bar gets bigger or smaller when you press on the button/analog direction that corresponds to it before you move to the next step. If this doesn't happen, then it may not save the button/analog direction to the Z Axis function. Same goes for the Z Rotation function below.---

    5. Axis Callibration (Move the Z Rotation all the way up and down...)
    --- After realizing that C-Up and C-Down corresponded to Z Axis, I assumed (correctly so) that C-Right and C-Left corresponded to Z Rotation. Again, on a 360 controller I'm not certain, but try one of your two analog sticks and see if it moves the bar. If you press a D-pad direction or any other buttons on your controller it will just skip this step, so make sure you figure out what moves the bar BEFORE you move on. The bar should get longer or smaller depending on what you push (for me, it was the C-Buttons on my N64 controller).

    6. Click 'Finish'

    Now in the 'Test' tab you can see that everything on your controller should correspond to something.When moving your Analog Stick the '+' inside that box should move. My C-Buttons correspond to raising or lowering the 'Z Ax...' and 'Z Ro...' bars, and I'm assuming one of your analog sticks may correspond to this function. Any time you press a button or a D-pad direction a button with a number should light up under the 'Buttons' section. And for the D-pad, in addition to a button lighting up, you should see an arrow on the edge of the circle in the 'Point of View Hat' section corresponding to the correct D-pad direction.

    Additionally, since you were talking about 007, when using my N64 controller (after mapping the buttons in PJ64, of course), the movement goes as follows:

    Up and Down on the Analog Stick moves you forwards and backwards
    Left and Right on the Analog Stick aims your gun left and right
    C-Left and C-Right make your character strafe left and right
    C-Up and C-Down make your character aim up and down

    I'm still not quite sure what was wrong with your movement in 007, but it might be due to (1) not having mapped the buttons correctly or (2) having C-Buttons correspond to direction on an Analog Stick. However, I guess we'll cross that bridge when we come to it. First try calibrating in windows and then mapping the keys in the Configuration button of PJ64. Then go in game and see if it works.
    Last edited by Scope32; April 18th, 2011 at 18:32.

  7. #7

    Default Re: 1964 emulator doesn't work.

    Ok, this is ridiculous!

    I'm trying to calibrate the blasted thing, but it's not working! I'll try to move the D-stick in a full circle, but if I move it just a little bit, it takes two minutes for the crosshair to finally stop moving! This thing is too senstive!

    So, what do I do? I cancel it out and start over. Now, I don't even have to touch the D-stick; the crosshair moves on its own!

    So, I close it down again, only this time, I click "reset to default." It STILL doesn't work!


  8. #8

    Default Re: 1964 emulator doesn't work.

    Honestly, why can't this piece of crap be like the ZSNES or the Visual Boy Advance? Everything's just plug and play with those guys!

    Why does the most basic stuff have to be a programming project!

    Maybe that's why it's called PROJECT 64!

  9. #9

    Default Re: 1964 emulator doesn't work.

    It sounds more like an issue of calibrating your Xbox 360 GamePad (and it being too sensitive) than the emulator mapping the keys properly. Unfortunately I don't have an Xbox 360 GamePad to better troubleshoot the problem. The good news being that Windows is definitely recognizing your GamePad, you just need to make sure it's calibrated (even if it seems a little too sensitive).

    Also, just so you know callibrating the controller in Windows is JUST to make sure it has functionality with the computer, which basically means whether it will work with the computer or not. The mapping of the keys within the emulator is completely arbitrary based on what buttons you want the controller to correspond to AS IF it were an N64 controller. On top of that you can also remap keys WITHIN the games themselves.

    This also might be the reason why you're having issues moving within 007 if you set your C-Buttons to correspond to an Analog Stick direction, as opposed to buttons. When trying to emulate a game, it's best to make your current GamePad make sense considering the logic of its original controller (in this case N64 controller logic). For instance, when I first played Zelda:OOT on PJ64 I tried mapping a mouse for the analog stick and keyboard keys for the other buttons; but a mouse doesn't work the same way as the logic of an Analog Stick (this was before I got an N64 USB Controller Adapter). Additionally, in my SNES9X emulator I didn't map my Analog Stick for the movement directions, I used the D-pad on my N64 controller, since an SNES controller only had a D-pad, 4 buttons (A, B, X, Y) and two triggers. Map your 360 controller as if it were an N64 controller; in other words, only use one analog stick, one D-pad, two buttons that correspond to A and B, and 4 buttons that correspond to the four directions of the C-Pad, and three triggers (Z, R, and L).
    Last edited by Scope32; April 18th, 2011 at 18:59.

  10. #10

    Default Re: 1964 emulator doesn't work.

    Quote Originally Posted by Scope32 View Post
    This also might be the reason why you're having issues moving within 007 if you set your C-Buttons to correspond to an Analog Stick direction
    I don't use the C-buttons to move. I use the C-buttons to use the camera.

    as opposed to buttons. When trying to emulate a game, it's best to make your current GamePad make sense considering the logic of its original controller (in this case N64 controller logic). For instance, when I first played Zelda:OOT on PJ64 I tried mapping a mouse for the analog stick and keyboard keys for the other buttons; but a mouse doesn't work the same way as the logic of an Analog Stick (this was before I got an N64 USB Controller Adapter). Additionally, in my SNES9X emulator I didn't map my Analog Stick for the movement directions, I used the D-pad on my N64 controller, since an SNES controller only had a D-pad, 4 buttons (A, B, X, Y) and two triggers. Map your 360 controller as if it were an N64 controller; in other words, only use one analog stick, one D-pad, two buttons that correspond to A and B, and 4 buttons that correspond to the four directions of the C-Pad, and three triggers (Z, R, and L).
    That's what I'm TRYING to do!

    But, why is it, when I map it the D-stick to the control stick, I can't move diagonally?

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